Sacred Fear and a Poem by Adam Zagajewski

972B16AD-333B-4A48-B3E0-811D4067F32C

From Assymetry: Poems, by Adam Zagajewski Trans. Clare Cavanagh (FSG 2018)

This lyric proceeds according to the logic of lyric: from the literal to the more subjective to the dialectical (as if seeking a new literal —- as if rust was hatred). That movement proves unsustainable in its metaphoricity. Only in the last line does the true subject emerge. Somehow yielding to the impulse to discover some wonder by the highway (now ironic ambiguities ramify) leads the youthful poet to a personal discovery, a discovery of the self’s lack of self-certainty.

Thus a small innocent looking poem exposes us to intolerable perplexities AND a new discovery. Rather than meekly accept our aesthetic paycheck for reading yet another fine poem, let’s see the implications.

First: The creative mind is indeterminate. It involves a space of nothingness. The form that emerges from a mindful reading is a different kind of knowledge than was assumed in the setting provided in the first lines. Second: Interpretations will depend on the intention of the mind of the reader. Desmond’s distinction between erotic and agapeic gets to the nub of the matter. In erotic mind, the search is for a determinate object. As we’ve seen, this kind is frustrated by the poem. For the agapeic mind, the search discovers an ‘other’ that is not determinate but involves a plenitude of being in excess of the erotic self.

Zagajewski’s ultimate concern is a state of soul that did not appear before now, a concern for a ‘self-transcending self’ that is part of the agapeic ethos. The search for historical mementos concludes by discovering an agapeic consciousness that we call metaxu: between the things of ‘history’ and the experience of sacred fear.

Author: Tom D'Evelyn

Tom D'Evelyn is a private editor and writing tutor in Cranston RI and, thanks to the web, across the US and in the UK. He can be reached at tom.develyn@comcast.net. D'Evelyn has a PhD in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley. Before retiring he held positions at The Christian Science Monitor, Harvard University Press, Boston University and Brown University. He ran a literary agency for ten years, publishing books by Leonard Nathan and Arthur Quinn, among others. Before moving to Portland OR he was managing editor at Single Island Press, Portsmouth NH. He blogs at http://tdevelyn.com and other sites.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s